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Happy Christmas (This isn't a Scam)

It really isn't - just a simple note to wish all the Infosec Pro readers a relaxing festive break, for yourself, friends and family.

2013 has been a interesting year yet again in the Infosec world.  Connectivity has been the buzz, with topics such as the 'Internet of Things' 'Relationship Management' and 'Social Graphing' all producing great value and enhanced user experiences, but have brought with them some tough challenges with regards to authentication, context aware security and privacy.



The government surveillance initiatives on both sides of the Atlantic, have brought home the seemingly omnipresent nature of snooping, hacking and eavesdropping.  Whilst not new (anyone read Spycatcher ?), the once private and encrypted world of email, SMS and telephony may now never be seen in the same light again.

Snowdon continues to grab the headlines, playing an elusive game of cat and mouse between the Russians and the United States.  If, as believed he has released only 1% of the material he has access to, 2014 could certainly be more interesting.

But what will 2014 bring?  Certainly the same corporate issues that have faced many organisations for the last 3 or 4 years have not been solved.

BYOD, identity assurance and governance, SIEM management, context aware authentication and the ever present 'big security data' challenges still exist.  I can only see these issues becoming of greater importance, more complex and more costly to solve.  The increased connected nature of individuals, things and consumers, is bringing organisations closer their respective market audiences, but requires interesting platforms, bringing together data warehousing, identity management, authentication and RESTful interfaces.  2014, may just be the year where security goes agile.  We can hope.

By Simon Moffatt

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