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Infosecurity Europe 2013: Embedding Security into the Business

A strong keynote panel discussed the best practices for embedding security into the business, and how the changing perceptions of information security are helping to place it as a key enabler to business growth.

Infosec Is The Oil Of The Car

Brian Brackenborough from Channel 4, best described information security as being "the oil in the car engine".  It's an integral part of the car's mobility, but shouldn't always be seen as the brakes, which can be construed by the business as being restrictive and limiting.  James McKinlay, from Manchester Airports Group, added that information security needs to move away from just being network and infrastructure focused and start to engage other business departments, such as HR, legal and other supply chain operators.

The panel agreed that information security needs to better engage all areas of the non-technical business landscape, in order to be fully effective.

Business Focused Language

Many information security decisions are made on risk management and how best to reduce risk, whilst staying profitable and not endangering user experience.  A key area of focus, is the use of a common business focused language when describing risk, the benefits of reduction and the controls involved in the implication.  According to James, organisations need to "reduce the gap between the business and infosec teams view of risk, and standardise on the risk management frameworks being used".

Education & Awareness

Geoff Harris from ISSA promoted the argument of better security awareness, as being a major security enabler.  He described how a basic 'stick' model of making offenders of basic infosec controls, buy doughnuts for the team, worked effectively, when used to reduce things like unlocked laptops.  James also pointed to "targeted and adaptive education and training" as being of great importance.  Different departments, have different goals, focuses and users, all which require specific training when it comes to keeping information assets secure.

All in all, the panel agreed, that better communication with regards to information security policy implementation and better gathering of business feedback when it comes to information security policy creation, are all essential.

By Simon Moffatt

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